Film Noir Series with David Abrams

  Wednesday nights are about to get dark and dangerous at the Library.   Join us for a new film series featuring classic film noir movies from the 1940s and 50s, a cinematic style full of dark streets, dangerous dames, and double-crosses. Many of you might be familiar with the term “film noir” (or, like me, you may already be a huge fan of these movies), but if not, you’ll see some great examples of the genre at the Library, including The Maltese Falcon, Double Indemnity, and Touch of Evil (see below for the complete list). Film noir, with its classic cinematography saturated in light and shadow, was characterized by particular elements: the femme fatale, the defeated hero, the wronged gangster, the dangerous-but-sensitive henchman, the moll, the lug, the palooka—you get the idea. These movies, often shot with low budgets out of necessity, focused on mood, stylized lighting and downbeat characters.   Though they were sometimes dismissed as low-grade “B” pictures at the time, in retrospect we can see what a major impact noir movies had (and continue to have) on the film industry. Film noir made lasting stars out of Humphrey Bogart and Robert Mitchum with legendary roles; boosted Joan Crawford’s Hollywood career when it started to sag; and set the stage for the later work of Martin Scorsese and Quentin Tarantino. And if you’re a fan of the AMC series Breaking Bad, you can thank film noir for giving us Walter White and all his meth-dealing troubles.   I’ve been a fan of film noir for decades—my love for the style probably started when Bogart looked at...