First Fridays: Nobody Speaks: Trials of the Free Press

Come join us on Friday, July 6th at Noon for a screening of Nobody Speaks: Trials of the Free Press. Summary: Hulk Hogan’s court case against Gawker Media sheds light on wealthy, powerful figures who challenge freedom of the press in order to silence critics. Director: Brian Knappenberger 2017 TV-141h...

First Fridays: What Happened to the News? with Dennis Swibold

What Happened to the News? with Dennis Swibold Professor, University of Montana School of Journalism Never has so much news been available. The trick is knowing how to find it—and how to judge its credibility. This program—presented by a veteran journalist, author and educator—takes listeners behind the curtain to reveal how the news is made and explain the revolutionary changes facing today’s fast-paced news media. It also offers citizens tools and techniques for staying well-informed amid the virtual blizzard of information—and for participating directly in the civic debates crucial to their communities, state and nation. Please join us Friday, June 1st for this informative lecture. This program brought to you in partnership with Humanities...

First Fridays: Andrea Stierle April 6, 2018

And now for something completely different – a search for drugs in really odd places. Travel with Andrea Stierle to the majestic Berkeley Pit in Butte Montana, ground zero of the largest EPA Superfund site in North America.  Andrea will describe some of the research that she and husband/collaborator Donald Stierle have been involved in for the past twenty-three years. This research began when the Stierles were faculty in the Department of Chemistry at Montana Tech.  They began their exploration of the secondary metabolites of fungi and bacteria surviving and thriving in an abandoned open-pit copper mine that has evolved into an acid mine waste lake. Berkeley Pit Lake now contains over 150 billion liters of metal sulfate rich, acidic “water” (pH 2.5) and sits at the headwaters of the Clark Fork and Columbia Rivers. With its low pH and high metal content, it was considered too toxic to support life.   In 1995, however, Andrea began to isolate fungi and bacteria from water and sediment samples provided by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology.  Although conditions within the Pit Lake System were too toxic for “normal” aquatic biota, these same conditions provided an ideal environment for extremophiles which have proven to be a dynamic source of bioactive drug-like molecules waiting to be discovered.  The Stierles moved their lab to the University of Montana in 2009 and are currently Research Professors in the Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences.  They have isolated compounds with activity against non-small cell lung cancer, ovarian cancer, melanoma, retinoblastoma and leukemia, as well as a new antibiotic with activity against MRSAs from this collection....

First Fridays – World Museum of Mining

On Friday, February 5th, our noon time series will feature a talk by Jeanette Kopf for the World Museum of Mining.  Ms. Kopf will speak about the Museum’s events, education, and volunteer opportunities this summer. The World Museum of Mining is located on the campus of Montana Tech here in Butte.  Since the museum is 95% outside, it is open from April 1st through October 31.  It offers underground tours at both the 65 foot level and the 100 foot level.  This museum offers a glimpse into the history of Butte during its heyday and a unique partof our culture.   From their website: The World Museum of Mining was founded in 1963 when the close of Butte’s mining heyday was less than two decades away. In the end, Butte experienced a century of hard-rock mining and earned the reputation of being home to one of the world’s most productive copper mines of all time. The Museum exists to preserve the enduring history of  Butte and the legacy of its rich mining and cultural heritage. The World Museum of Mining is one of the few museums in the world located on an actual mine yard, the Orphan Girl Mine. With fifty exhibit buildings, countless artifacts, and sixty-six primary exhibits in the mine yard, visitors can spend a couple of hours to an entire day lost in the unfolding story. By walking the streets of Hell Roarin’ Gulch and venturing to the depths of the Orphan Girl Mine, you can almost see their blackened faces and hear their exhausted sighs at the conclusion of the workday.   For more information...