Edible Book Festival

EAT YOUR WORDS! Butte Public Library 3rd Edible Book Festival Create your own edible book and enter to win.  Saturday April 27 3:00 pm. All entries should represent a book, literary character or author and be edible.  Entries may be submitted on April 27 from 12:00-2:00. Ernest Hamingway Grapes of...

ACT Study Groups

BSBPL Hosts:  ACT Study groups for Teens! Target problem areas to study more efficiently!  Each session will cover the most common topics and concepts tested.  Free for all high school students. English March 5     4-5   Teen Zone Math March 12   4-5   Teen Zone Reading March 19   4-5   Teen Zone Science March 26   4-5   Teen Zone Practice Test March 2      10:30    Community Room, Basement March 30   10:30     Community Room, Basement  ...

Memoir writing

Starting February 7th, BSBPL will host a Life Writing Group on Thursdays from 1:30 to 3:30.  This initial meeting will last about 8 weeks, with a chance it may continue if there is interest.  This informed group will meet to share stories and practice writing.  You don’t have to be a great or even good writer to work on your memories and family history–you just have to be interested in chronicling these valuable stories for all time. This event is free and open to the public.  No registration required.  You are not required to attend every meeting.  Just bring pen and paper.  For more information, call Carol Eaglefeathers at 406-498-1475. About memoir writing: Jerry Jenkins Marion Roach NY Book...

Homes & Honky Tonks: Post WWII Women in Country Music with Almeda Bradshaw

Join us for a special afternoon event with Almeda Bradshaw on December 29th at 2:00 pm in the Big Butte room on the third floor of the library.  Almeda is returning after a highly successful First Fridays in September.  She combines history with music for a thoroughly entertaining time.  Brought to you with a grant by Humanities Montana. Homes & Honky Tonks: Post WWII Women in Country Music For working class country folk, honky tonk music became their voice of loneliness and alienation as men and women coped with the stress and adjustments of life after the atomic bomb. 1950s suburban conformity, meant to help normalize the family unit, only contributed to feelings of victimization for both sexes. Examine how PTSD, then unrecognized, contributed to the dysfunction of families and learn how Kitty Wells, Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn and others responded in their songs to the social changes of post-World War II America. Program information here Artist...

First Fridays: Swinging Through American History with Mark Matthews

Butte-Silver Bow Public Library will continue their First Fridays series on December 7th at noon with guest speaker, Mark Mathews.  His talk is entitled “Swinging through American History.”  Matthews will take you back to the ballrooms, taverns, juke joints, honky tonks and dance emporiums of the past as he explains the manner in which American dancing evolved with certain social changes–and, how certain dances stimulated changes in American social life. The spectrum of historic dances runs from the colonial English country dance to the French quadrille to the American square dance and the waltz; plus modern movements such as the one-steps, the Charleston, Lindy hop, mambo, twist and disco. Mark will even get the more adventurous audiences out of their chairs and onto their feet to experience the joy of movement. Brought to you with a grant from Humanities...

First Fridays: Montana Towns: Then, Now, Tomorrow with Hal Stearns

Our First Fridays series continues with Hal Stearns.  He presents his talk about Montana Towns.  Joins us Friday, November 2 at noon. Montana is a state of extremes, from high mountains to great plains. Half the population lives in just five communities and another third of residents lives in just ten others. After the big ones, the remaining 134 incorporated towns are often unique, often overlooked, and all small, yet personify so much of the Big Sky. These small towns were built around gold, coal and oil, timber, cows and sheep, early trails, roads and rails. But time brings change. Why do some smaller towns hang in while others drift away? A few invent new roles and others reinvent themselves. Should we care? A discussion helps us understand the small places that are a big part of the Montana...