BE YOU! A PRIDE Month Celebration at BSBPL

Each week throughout June, BSBPL will host an event encourage patrons to be themselves.  Get in touch with your authentic self and celebrate the diversity of those around you who enrich your life and welcome each other to exist fully.  Each week will feature a different event. Come to one or come to all! All are welcome. June 6: 1985 movie screening 5:30 pm Big Butte Room, Library 1985 pays tribute to a generation of lost lives with a powerfully make look at how HIV and the social attitude surrounding homosexuality affect one man’s choices. June 13: Geek Night! 5:30 pm Big Butte Room, Library Escape the real world and be your own storyteller with the help of a veteran Dungeon Master!  This 2 hour session with include in informative overview about RPGs (Role Playing Games) and a chance to play a campaign.  We will supply the materials, just come with a willingness to learn (or continue learning). Open to different styles of play.  Dungeon & Dragons is a collaborative storytelling game that teaches accountability and celebrates the creativity of unique individuals. Josh Pate-Terry, our Dungeon Master, has played and mastered hundreds of games over the last 30 years and loves teaching new people! Josh will be joined by his wife Sabina, an talented player and game master with five years of experience with tabletop RPGs. June 20: Roundtable Discussion 5:30 pm IBRC 68 W Park St For Pride Month, the Butte Public Library is interested in hosting a discussion on what it’s like to “Be You!” in Butte, Montana. Aimed at teens and young adults, but open to all ages,...

Voices of Butte: John Castle II

John Castle II is the final contributor to the LGBTQ: Voices of Butte oral history project. By the age of two or three, John was aware of his attraction to men. Shortly thereafter, he realized this same-sex attraction was frowned upon by society and went into the closet until he was in his early 20s. When he finally came out to his family in 1992 the news spread quickly. With approximately 85 cousins living in Butte, it didn’t take long before it seemed like the entire town was aware of his sexual orientation. Life suddenly became harder. http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_castle_excerpt1.mp3   Shortly thereafter, John moved to Missoula where he met his partner, whereupon they moved to San Diego, California and Portland, Oregon. Although he and his significant other parted ways after arriving in Portland, John remained in the city he quickly grew to love, because “you can just be yourself. No one cares if you’re gay, straight, black, white, they don’t care. Just don’t be a jerk.” During this time, he completed his masters in education and worked with students with extreme emotional behavior disorders. Approximately five years ago, John and his current partner moved back to Butte to take care of his mother. Despite his nervousness at returning to a town that treated him ill as a young man, he experienced a completely different climate. The general population has little tolerance for homophobia and gay-bashing, and the passage of the non-discrimination act in 2014 further supports the ongoing acceptance of LGBTQ individuals in Butte. Shortly after his return, John landed a job working at Farm in the Dell-Butte, a working...

Voices of Butte: Onyx Mulock

Onyx Mulock recently contributed her story to the LGBTQ: Voices of Butte oral history project. Unlike other individuals willing to contribute their story to this project who reflect upon decades of their life, Onyx is near the beginning of her story. Having moved to Butte from Grand Forks, North Dakota about three years ago, Onyx recently graduated from Butte High School.  She came out as bisexual to her family and friends in eighth grade and received common responses like “it’s just a phase” or “you’re just jealous of other girls’ bodies.” Onyx managed to connect with a small group of friends in high school that allow her to be free and open about her sexuality first, and now her sexual identification. http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_mulock_excerpt1.mp3   The six minute interview will be available in the near future through the Montana Memory...

Voices of Butte: Randy Paul and Dan Hunter

Randy Paul and Dan Hunter recently contributed their story to the LGBTQ: Voices of Butte oral history project. Randy and Paul have been a couple for 23 years. They met at an HIV support group meeting in Couer d’Alene, Idaho and have been together ever since. According to Randy, when they met “we thought he only had like 61 T-cells and I had a little over 200. We thought, well if we have two or three years together, that would be a blessing. And 22, 23 years later, we’re still here.” http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_randyanddan_excerpt1.mp3   Over the years, family came to terms with their sexuality and their partnership, but it was somewhat rocky at first for both of them. Dan told his parents he was gay at the age of 16, and they initially responded by sending him to a psychiatrist and counseling. Randy, raised Jehovah’s Witness, was disowned. Before moving to Butte, Randy and Paul attended Lutheran churches, but never felt comfortable in an environment that was not entirely welcoming of LGBTQ people. They found the United Congregational Church upon their move to Butte, and immediately felt a sense of community.  In 2012, Randy and Paul had a holy union at the church, before same-sex marriage became legal in Montana. http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_randyanddan_excerpt2.mp3   The entire 35-minute interview will be available in the near future through the Montana Memory Project....

Voices of Butte: Rick Holman

Rick Holman recently contributed his story to the LGBTQ: Voices of Butte oral history project. Rick moved away from Butte in 1968 at the age of 18 for Seattle and Spokane, Washington, where he immersed himself in the gay culture of city life. He eventually found himself surrounded by the glamor of Hollywood. Love of a man brought him to Texas, where he lived for a number of years continuing a variety of jobs, including owning a gay bar and a pet store. In 1983 while still in Houston, Rick met the love of his life. They were together 14 years. Around 1990 they moved to Butte to care for Rick’s parents, who were struggling with health issues. http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_holman_excerpt1.mp3   Rick and Tony remained a couple until Tony’s death from AIDS in 1997. Rick was eventually diagnosed with AIDS on World AIDS Day in 1999. Having lived through the AIDS crisis in Houston–where he and Tony once attended 214 funerals in one year–Rick was no stranger to helping people diagnosed with AIDS. For 12 years, Rick was the Executive Director of Butte AIDS Support Services. He was invited to serve on the Governor’s AIDS Advisory Council, and received two Governor’s AIDs Awards for Outstanding Prevention from Governor Judy Martz and Governor Marc Rosco. After a lifetime of activism in the LGBTQ community, Rick has advice for young LGBTQ people who are making their way in the world: http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_holman_excerpt2.mp3   The entire 40-minute interview will be available in the near future through the Montana Memory...

Voices of Butte: Tom Galster

Tom Galster recently contributed his story to the LGBTQ: Voices of Butte oral history project. Born and raised in Butte, Tom moved out of state at the age of 17, first to Houston, Texas and then Anchorage, Alaska. He first realized his sexuality as a gay man while living in Texas. He contracted AIDS while in Anchorage in the early 1980s shortly thereafter and was one of the first people diagnosed with AIDS in the United States. He eventually moved to Lower Lake, California with his partner, where he worked at Homestead Goldmine as maintenance personnel. http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_galster_excerpt1.mp3   Tom’s partner died of AIDS. It took all of three days. According to Tom, “We thought he had a cold. I came home and his skin came off in my hands. I took him to the hospital and 10 minutes later he was dead.” Tom continued to struggle with AIDS after his partner’s death, which is what brought him back to Butte in 1994. Tom and his mother attempted to start a Butte chapter of PFLAG and Pride in the early 1990s, but they lacked community support to sustain the organizations. http://buttepubliclibrary.info/wp-content/uploads/lgbtq_galster_excerpt2.mp3   The entire 28-minute interview will be available in the near future through the Montana Memory Project. If interested in contributing your story to this project, please contact Marian at programming.bsbpl@gmail.com or 732-3361...