2nd Annual Edible Book Festival

In conjunction with National Library Week, Butte Public Library is holding its 2nd Annual Edible Book Festival on Saturday, April 8 at 3:00 pm! The Edible Book Festival is an annual event usually held on or around April 1, which is also known as Edible Book Day. The global event has been celebrated since 2000 in various parts of the world, where edible books are created, displayed, and small events are held. The creations are photographed, judged by a panel of judges, and then consumed. There are two rules: entries must be edible and they must somehow relate to a book. Edible books can look like a book in form and shape, be inspired by a book or author, can be a pun of a book title, can refer to a book character, reproduce a book cover, or just have something to do with books in general. Entries may be made from anything that is edible (cake, bread, crackers, Jell-o, fruit, vegetables, candy, etc.) as long as it can sit out for an hour or two without melting, turning bad, or getting scary. Last year, the courageous participants in the 1st Annual Edible Book Festival explored a multiplicity of genres and foods. Whether you’re a professional chef or just like to play with your food, the festival is open to anyone in the community. If you need ideas, an online search of “Edible Book Festival” provides plenty of inspiration! Schedule for the 2017 Edible Book Festival on Saturday, April 8, 2017. 1:30-2:30pm – Participants drop off edible entries on the 3rd floor of the library in the Big Butte...

Hot Topics – Russian Hacking of U.S. Presidential Elections

The alarming response to Russian meddling in American democracy, The Economist, December 11, 2016 Barack Obama promises retaliation against Russia over hacking during US election, The Guardian, December 16, 2016 Russia’s View of the Election Hacks: Denials, Amusement, Comeuppance, The New Yorker, December 20, 2016 Can U.S. election hack be traced to Russia? BBC, December 22, 2016 U.S. set to announce response to Russian hacking: sources, Fiscal Times, December 28, 2016 Russian Hacking in the U.S. Election, New York Times, (ongoing coverage) Did Putin Direct Russian Hacking? And Other Big Questions, The Atlantic, January 6, 2017 By Zscout370 at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link  ...

Hot Topics – Paris Climate Agreement

Paris Agreement, Council on Foreign Relations, December 12, 2015 United Nations Climate Change Newsroom (ongoing coverage) A Reader’s Guide to the Paris Agreement, The Atlantic, December 16, 2015 CAIT Climate Data Explorer, World Resources Institute (ongoing coverage) The Clean Energy Revolution, Council on Foreign Relations, May/June, 2016 The Climate Change Inquisition, Heritage Foundation, October 24, 2016 Environmental Policy Under Donald Trump, The Economist, November 15, 2016 Hundreds of U.S. Businesses Urge Trump To Uphold Paris Climate Deal, NPR, November 17, 2016...

Hot Topics – The Dakota Access Pipeline

Life in the Native American Oil Protest Camps (in pictures), BBC News, September 2, 2016 A Pipeline Fight and America’s Dark Past, The New Yorker, September 6, 2016 The Legal Case for Blocking the Dakota Access Pipeline,The Atlantic, September 9, 2016 Understanding the Controversy Behind the Dakota Access Pipeline, Smithsonian Magazine, September 14, 2016 AFL-CIO Backs Dakota Access Pipeline and the “Family Supporting Jobs” It Provides, In These Times, September 17, 2016 America Needs the Dakota Access Pipeline, Newsmax, September 19, 2016 Dakota Access Pipeline and the Future of American Labor, Common Dreams, September 29, 2016 Dakota Access Pipeline (ongoing coverage), Democracy Now! Repercussions of Dakota Access Pipeline Delay, Real Clear Energy, October 17, 2016 Amnesty International USA to Monitor the North Dakota Pipeline Protests, Amnesty International, October 28,...

Introducing Granville Stuart

Say hello to Butte Public Library’s mascot Granville Stuart! If you follow the library’s Facebook page, you may have noticed an old man in a top hat making a frequent appearance throughout the library. The original Granville Stuart (1834-1918), nicknamed “Mr. Montana,” was well-known in early Butte. Throughout his life, he was a prospector, miner, merchant, writer, gunsmith, blacksmith, butcher, horse-trader, real estate speculator, banker, rancher, diplomat, and librarian who played a significant role in the early history of Montana. Stuart crossed the continental divide October 10, 1857, seven years before Montana officially became a territory. Before settling in Butte, Stuart led a colorful life, which included marrying a twelve-year-old Shoshoni girl Awbonnie Tookanka in 1862 at the age of 24, expanding his family by eleven children, leading a vigilante band–“Stuart’s Stranglers”–that executed alleged rustlers, remarrying a year after Awbonnie’s death in 1888 to a 26 year old Allis Belle Brown Fairfield, working as ambassador of Paraguay and Uraguay for President Cleveland beginning in 1894, and continually trying to overcome precarious financial circumstances as he moved from one venture to the next. In 1898, the Stuarts returned to Montana and settled in Butte where they managed a boarding house called The Dorothy. In 1905 he became the head librarian at Butte Public Library. He retired in 1914 and devoted himself to writing, a life-long pursuit that left behind various diaries and books. To learn more about the real Granville Stuart, Montana: the Magazine of Western History has a fascinating article about him in the Autumn, 1986 issue.  ...